Reduced Alcohol Consumption Shown to Decrease Risk of Heart Disease

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Heart Disease Statistics

Heart disease has had a detrimental impact of healthcare for decades.  Recent estimates indicate that 6000,000 individuals in the U.S. die from heart disease, making it the most common form of death in the U.S. [1].  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) state that coronary heart disease is the most common condition that kills individuals, claiming 380,000 victims every year [1].

With national statistics as strong and convincing as these providing by the CDC, individuals are looking to reduce heart disease risk in any way possible.  The most notable way to reduce heart disease risk is through lifestyle.

Lifestyle Factors

There are a number of lifestyle factors that are associated with heart disease including smoking habits, alcohol consumption, diet and exercise habits, and stress levels.  There has been a national struggle to reduce the prevalence of smoking over the past few decades.  In addition, diet and exercise continue to be influential in reducing heart disease risk.

Lowering sodium intake, saturated fat intake, and exercising regularly have all been found to be associated with a reduced risk from heart disease.  One final lifestyle aspect that has received recent attention is the amount of alcohol consumption on heart disease risk.

A recent study on alcohol consumption on heart disease risk found that people who drank 17 percent less alcohol per week had a 10 percent reduced risk of coronary heart disease [2].  This study adds to research that the moderate consumption of alcohol can have beneficial impacts on health and the authors concluded that those who drink low to moderate amounts of alcohol are more likely to lead a more physically active lifestyle and eat a more balanced and better diet.

This study reiterates the fact that lifestyle is primarily about moderation.  Everything can be harmful if overindulged, but when moderation is exhibited, health flourishes.

References

[1] http://www.cdc.gov/heartdisease/facts.htm

[2] http://www.wallstreetotc.com/booze-good-heart-health-blood-pressure/25743/

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